Are you on Twitter? Here’s some advice on managing harassment.

It’s been an odd couple of weeks for me. As a result, my Twitter-sphere has been busier than usual. While the vast majority of the feedback I’ve received has been polite, a small fraction has not. Strange men seem to believe I’m interested in their unsolicited opinions on my gender, sexuality, mental health, and appearance. Sometimes all at once. To clarify, I am not.

A cartoon of a person in side profile holding a phone. The light from the phone shines on their face.
A cartoon of a person in side profile holding a phone. The light from the phone shines on their face.
Photo by visuals on Unsplash
A word cloud in the shape of the Twitter logo. Some of the most prominent words include block, report, and mute.
A word cloud in the shape of the Twitter logo. Some of the most prominent words include block, report, and mute.
Word cloud illustrating the advice I received on what to do with Twitter harassment.
A table describing the differences between muting and blocking users on Twitter.
A table describing the differences between muting and blocking users on Twitter.
What’s the difference between muting and blocking?
  1. Mute often and without hesitation. Let them scream into the void. By muting, you avoid giving them the satisfaction of knowing you spent even a fraction of a second thinking about them.
  • Who don’t follow you;
  • With a new account;
  • Who have a default profile photo;
  • Who haven’t confirmed their email;
  • Who haven’t confirmed their phone number.

Written by

Nonbinary + queer + #firstgen + depression/anxiety. Bioinformatics postdoc w/ @Decarvalho_lab . Ovarian cancer + epigenetics + machine learning. They/them.

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